Gary Cole: Newsboy (A Conversation with Jon Grand)

Gary Cole's memoir Newsboy: Along My Route in Chicagoland 1968-1975 is already a Book Stall bestseller, and we are delighted to welcome the author for this virtual program, where he will talk about this new book with our in-house historican and all-arround amazement of a guy, Jon Grand.  While this event is free, you need to register HERE to reserve your place. 

Your purchase of newsboy from The Book Stall insures we can continue to offer our programming at no charge to the public. Order online, stop by the store, or give us a call at 847-446-8880.

About the BookGary Cole began his paper route for the Chicago Tribune in 1968, at the age of eight.  Within weeks after he started his route, Martin Luther King was assassinated. As a young boy growing up in a tranquil suburb who had not previously been exposed to the news, he was stunned by the ensuing explosion of events that made the headlines of the Tribune: riots across the country, the shooting of Robert Kennedy, and the chaos of the Democratic National Convention, among others.

Newsboy is a captivating chronicle of a child’s efforts to come to grips with the momentous stories he tracks in the Tribune through this turbulent period, including the collapse of the 1969 Cubs, the Chicago Seven trial, and notorious Illinois corruption scandals. The memoir is also an intimate portrayal of his route and customers, in particular the elderly residents of the Chimney Apartments from a bygone era when paperboys came to the door of each subscriber both to deliver and to collect.

"Like a bike ride through a turbulent, unsettling, yet beautiful landscape, Cole's deceptively simple tale of a kid delivering newspapers on his trusty Schwinn is so much more than what it at first appears.  In clear and concise language the tale propels us through the awakening of a happy but innocent and unworldly boy to the cultural changes occurring around him.  The world is exploding, and, as the newsboy learns, so is he.  The print he delivers--and reads in wonder--and the people he meets and listens to on his route become the education of a lifetime.  By the end of Newsboy you'll marvel that this kid has taught you so much.  I loved this book."  Rick Telander, Sports Columnist, Chicago Sun-Times

About the Author: Gary D. Cole was raised in the Chicago area and graduated from Williams College and Stanford Law School, where he acted in numerous theater productions.  Gary practiced law at the Central Intelligence Agency before writing a play based loosely on his Agency experience.  While a partner at a Portland, Oregon law firm, Gary in 1995 founded a professional theater company, CoHo Productions, that still performs in the black box theater he developed for the company.

In 2003, Gary was appointed by the Bush administration to head the $60 million annual grants program at the National Endowment for the Arts.  The administration later withdrew his appointment, reportedly because of two provocative plays filmed by a theater video company founded by Gary called StageDirect.  Gary has written a memoir about his odyssey through the arts and politics entitled Artless.

Gary’s latest work, Newsboy, is a childhood memoir that revolves around his suburban Chicago paper route in the late 1960s and early ‘70s. It’s essentially a prequel to Artless, which picks up five years after Newsboy leaves off. Gary has also written a novel, Black Box. Drawing on his extensive experience in both theater and business, Black Box is a story of players, on stage and off, making deals to save or sell their souls.

Gary now resides in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. He is married to Amy Cole. They have two children, Graham and Alaina.

 

Event date: 

Tuesday, September 28, 2021 - 6:30pm to 7:30pm

Event address: 

Online Crowdcast event!
$19.95
SKU: 9780985010539

 

About the book:

Newsboy is a captivating chronicle of a child’s efforts to come to grips with the momentous stories he tracks in the Tribune through this turbulent period, including the collapse of the 1969 Cubs, the Chicago Seven trial, and notorious Illinois corruption scandals. The memoir is also an intimate portrayal of his route and customers, in particular the elderly residents of the Chimney Apartments, from a bygone era when paperboys came to the door of each subscriber both to deliver and to collect.

About the author:

Gary Cole began his paper route for the Chicago Tribune in 1968, at the age of eight.  Within weeks after he started his route, Martin Luther King was assassinated. As a young boy growing up in a tranquil suburb who had not previously been exposed to the news, he was stunned by the ensuing explosion of events that made the headlines of the Tribune:  riots across the country, the shooting of Robert Kennedy, and the chaos of the Democratic National Convention, among others.